Old Mills in the United States
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Ohio Mills by County & Mill Names

 

Loramie Mill
Collapsed into a Heap as of June 4, 2011

As of 1989, the Loramie Flour Mill stands on the Miami & Erie Canal. It is closed, and appears to be used for storage. The 3 1/2-story frame structure is covered with horizontal lap siding that was once painted white. The mill has a tin roof and many 2 over 2 double-hung windows.

The words "LORAMIE MILL," "FLOUR," and "GRAIN" are painted on the front of the building. I could not locate any historical documentation on this mill. It was obviously a flourmill as indicated from the sign and the height of the building. It appears to have been abandoned for some time. It was constructed in the mid 1800's to take advantage of the waterpower generated by the canal and lock at the site across the road. The pool of water in front of the mill in the photograph is a part of the Miami Erie Canal.

Although the mill hasn't been used for a number of years, it's business had to have flourished during the canal days. I suspect that it was built at the advent of the canal due to the building's immediate location on the canal. Like all old canal mills in Ohio that are still extant, this one's history should reflect a successful business. The existence of the canal offered not only a regional, but a state wide and national market for the mill.

Privately owned, the mill is not accessible but can be easily viewed from the surrounding area. Aside from the miscellaneous machinery in front of the mill, it is very attractive and nostalgic.

On June 4, 2011, I found the mill building collapsed.

DIRECTIONS: Shelby County. Washington Township. From Piqua in Miami County, E. on Main Street, N. on Piqua-Lockington Road, 2-3 miles, left on Landman Mill Road, 1 mile on left.

 

Loramie Mill, Shelby County, Ohio. Exterior.  On the Miami and Erie Canal.
Photographed 1989.
The water with the reflection of the old mill is the Miami & Erie Canal.
Directly behind where I stood to take this picture is the canal lock you can see in the pictures below.
Loramie Mill, Shelby County, Ohio. Mill Collapsed. Miami and Erie Canal and Lock.
Sad ruins of the Loramie Mill found me on June 4, 2011. A collapsed pile of boards remained. How disappointed to loose one of Ohio's old mills.
Loramie Mill, Shelby County, Ohio. Mill Collapsed. Miami and Erie Canal and Lock.
Closeup of the remains of Loramie Mill. As you saw from my photo from 1989, the reflection of the mill was quite spectacular on the Miami Erie Canal. As I turned 180 degrees from this picture I photographed one of the Miami Erie Canal locks.
What follows below is that lock.
Miami Erie Canal Lock near Lockington, Ohio. Shelby County.
The Miami Erie Canal was constructed between 1825 and 1845.
The canal was buit from Todedo on Lake Erie to Cincinnati to the Ohio River with 244.5 miles.
Miami Erie Canal Lock near Lockington, Ohio. Shelby County.
Over the 244.5 miles of the canal there were 103 canal locks such as this one in Lockington, Ohio.
Miami Erie Canal Lock near Lockington, Ohio. Shelby County.
The skilled craftsmenship can be evidenced with the fine-cut sandstone blocks. The reason why the front corner of the lock is curved is so when the boats pulled through or out of the locks they were not damaged.
Miami Erie Canal Lock near Lockington, Ohio. Shelby County.

How wonderful it would be to take this beautiful canal lock and have it cleaned up for a park.
Everyone would enjoy walking around the area and discover the history of Ohio's canals.
Today 2011 you can see it is still in excellent condition.

Miami Erie Canal Lock near Lockington, Ohio. Shelby County.
"In the vicinity of Locking, Ohio you will find the Lockington Locks State Memorial with a series of five locks."
In this vicinity, the locks dropped the canal boats 67 feet in elevation over a one-half mile distance.
I understand there are remnants of one of the "19 aqueducts built along the Miami Erie Canal" visible in Loramie Creek.

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