Old Mills in the United States
E-Mail Us
Ohio Mills by County & Mill Names
Main Page
Interior
Steam Engine & Leffel Boiler
1990 Photographs
Exterior
Vertical Millstones
History
2011 Photographs


Algonquin Steam Mill History

Located in the village of Petersburg, Ohio the Algonquin Steam Mill is named after the town's old name, Algonquin.

Originally water-powered, the gristmill site was established in 1818 by George Tope who moved here from Pennsylvania around 1800. It is thought that the present mill building was constructed around 1826 but there is little evidence to support this date. Evidence of the early dam and millrace are still found up stream on the Little McGuire Creek. The tailrace can also be traced.

The gristmill was water-powered with an external waterwheel and milled with buhrstones. William Cory bought the mill in the early 1890's. Probably, due to the undependable supply of water, Cory converted the power source to steam and installed an Erie City Boiler made in Erie, Pennsylvania and a Star Steam Engine made in Canton, Ohio. This steam engine and boiler supplied the power source for the mill until it closed in 1938. In 1894, Cory installed a modern roller mill that helped the mill's prosperity. The early 1900's found the mill producing 25 barrels a day grinding wheat, corn and buckwheat. The mill's storage capacity was 1,000 bushels. The storage garners are still in place. Original equipment includes, a cleaner built by Orville Simpson Company from Cincinnati, Ohio, flour dressers, and a Case centrifugal reel for bolting.

The mill closed in 1938 and continued to deteriorate until 1969, when it and 3.88 acres were purchased by the Carroll County Historical Society from Mr. and Mrs. Chambers. The Society proceeded to restore the mill to the way it had functioned in 1900. In 1971, the first Algonquin Mill Festival was held. Each October, there is a three day celebration during which the mill grinds wheat, corn and buckwheat. The Stanley Ebling farm, across the road from the mill, became available and the Historical Society purchased it, and the festival has grown into an event that draws thousands of people each year.

The beauty of the old steam mill is alluring. With 2 1/2 stories, naturally weathered lap siding and a large chimney, the mill presents an exciting scene. The structure is 26' X 36' and rests on a full basement. This mill is one of Ohio's finest. The Carroll County Historical Society has authentically preserved this old mill for everyone to appreciate. Thank you CCHS.

For information on the Algonquin Mill Fall Festival, and visiting the interior of the mill mill during the year, contact: Carroll County Historical Society, 234 Autumn Road Southwest, Carrollton, Ohio (330)627-5910 ("Alogonquin Mill."; Garber, D.W. Letter to The Ohio Historical Society; Griffin; Steer).

Owners of Algonquin Mill

George Tope established mill site in 1818

Tope family operated the mill after George's death in 1845

Alexander Riley bought and operated the mill in 1865

Dr. Jasper Tope purchased the mill 1879

William N. Cory purchased the mill and converted it into an 1890 steam-powered engine

Marion Hardesty purchased the mill in 1900

Clair Hardest, Marion's son purchased the mill ?

John H Miller purchased the mill and installed 1917 additional boilers

After 120 years, the Algonquin Steam Mill closed in 1938

DIRECTIONS: Carroll County. Union Township. From Carrollton, south on S.R. 332, 4 miles to Petersburg, left on Autumn Road, immediately on left. Click Here for Google Map.
Above is a YouTube video about the Algonquin Steam Mill

Exterior
Algonquin Steam Mill - Exterior
Steam Engine & Leffel Boiler
Algonquiin Steam Mill - Vertical Millstones
Interior
Algonquin Steam Mill - History
History
Algonquin Steam Mill - Steam Engine & Leffel Boiler
Vertical Millstones
Algonquiin Steam Mill - 1990 Photographs
1990 Photographs
Algonquin Steam Mill - Interior
Main Page
Algonquin Steam Mill - Main Page
2011 Photographs
Algonquin Steam Mill - 2011 Photographs

Top of Page