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Stratton Mill

When John F. Stratton heard that a railroad line was going to go through Flushing, he decided to build a flourmill in proximity of the rail. With the advent of the railroad construction, a 1,500-foot tunnel was built in Flushing. The stone removed from the tunnel was granite. In 1877, it was this stone that was used in the construction of the Stratton Mill. The stone is beautiful with varying hues of pink, gray, black and red. The stone was laid using a method called "ruble wall." The masonry work is exquisite. The main building is 30' X 40' and is 2 1/2 stories with a stone basement. There is also a one-story 20' X 30' room attached to the main structure that was the steam engine room. The engine room is also constructed of stone. The mill has some interesting architectural characteristics. All of the doors and windows have an arched red brick, decorative header. The stone has been laid with such care, that the various colors blend in such a manner as to create a unique appearance. The entrance door has a stone at the portal that shows years of foot traffic. There is an energy, a presence, that this structure emits, that gives the sense of an area that has experienced great activity.

John Stratton bought a steam engine and boiler manufactured by the Buckeye Engine Company of Salem, Ohio. He made the wooden pulleys, and round and hexagon flour bolts, and the corn sheller. Unfortunately, John Stratton did not live to enjoy his endeavors. In 1878, he died of typhoid fever. John's brother Charles and brother-in-law Joseph Branson completed the mill's construction. They added the roof and opened the flour mill, running two sets of buhrstones powered by the steam engine. The Buckeye Steam Engine that John Stratton purchased in 1877 powered the flourmill until 1906.

At age 14, John Stratton's son George W. Stratton became involved with the mill's operation. In 1896, at 19 years of age, George Stratton assumed complete responsibility for the mill. In 1906, George Stratton installed a 50 HP St. Mary's Gas Engine to power the mill, replacing John Stratton's steam engine. Around 1930, George replaced the gas engine with a 50 HP Ball Bearing Fairbanks electric motor. This motor proved to be too expensive to run. In 1933, he acquired two used Fairbank's "Y" Oil Engines. One had 25 HP and the other had 15 HP. It was in 1937 that George saw an advertisement in the "American Miller" for a 50 HP Buckeye Diesel, single-cylinder, horizontal type engine. He traveled to Millerport, New York, and bought it. This diesel engine used National Refiring #2 Fuel Oil. It was said about the new diesel engine that, "The Feed Mill can be put on or taken off when the flour mill is running with scarcely a noticeable change of speed." George operated the mill through 1959. One of George's five sons, William, operated the mill until it closed in the early 1960's. William Stratton, the last miller that operated Stratton's Mill died in 1988.

In 1989, the Stratton Stone Mill Foundation was established and is working for the restoration of the old mill. Because of Stratton Mill's unique source of its stone construction material, the skilled masonry, and its rich history, Stratton Mill is an ideal candidate for restoration. If you are interested in the objective and activities of the Stratton Stone Mill Foundation, write to them at 40535 Dunn Road, Flushing, OH 43977. ("The Stratton Flour Mill.")

DIRECTIONS: Belmont County. Flushing Township. S.R. 149 north into Flushing, right on Mill Road which is located just inside the city limits, .5 mile, on left.

 

Stratton Mill, Belmont County, Ohio
Stratton Mill, Belmont County, Ohio
Stratton Mill, Belmont County, OhioStratton Mill, Belmont County, Ohio
Stratton Mill, Belmont County, Ohio
Stratton Mill, Belmont County, Ohio
Stratton Mill, Belmont County, Ohio

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